0 0
Read Time:4 Minute, 55 Second
Higher Ed Jobs: Four Questions to Ask in a Job Interview Right Now

Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.


Higher Ed Jobs: Four Questions to Ask in a Job Interview Right Now

Read Four Questions to Ask in a Job Interview Right Now by Justin Zackal, from HigherEdJobs.com, December 10, 2020.

Are you job-searching right now? Or plan to search for a job soon? Is your department planning to hire new staff in the next few months? Consider these four questions that every candidate should ask new employers right now. While geared towards higher education, the questions can be asked by anyone in any industry. Just change the emphasis to the industry where you’re currently looking for work to tailor the questions.

What is your institution’s/department’s top priority right now?

How has the workplace culture evolved with people working remotely?

What have you learned about your institution/department during the pandemic?

Any question that shows your long-term interest.

I had originally planned to post about why people being interviewed should interview the interviewers. But this article better articulated what I believe are better questions to ask instead:

Ask why employees stay there so long. [Or] about plans for the next 5-10 years. [A]bout opportunities for you to develop within the institution, and not what kind of exposure you can get outside of it. Ask about developing a curriculum, a capital campaign, or anything else that takes years to complete. Most importantly, ask about relationships and how collaboration is rewarded.

by Justin Zackal, from HigherEdJobs.com, December 10, 2020.

Continue reading Four Questions to Ask in a Job Interview Right Now by Justin Zackal, from HigherEdJobs.com, December 10, 2020.


Harvard Business Review: Are You Worried That Your New Colleagues Resent You?

Read Are You Worried That Your New Colleagues Resent You? by Nihar Chhaya, from Harvard Business Review, December 16, 2020.

I read this article because I have never had an issue worrying about how my colleagues have felt about me. In higher education, you often interview with dozens of people throughout the day-long interview. This lets you have a more firm idea of who you’ll work with. But I know that in other industries, this isn’t always the case. You can find yourself with co-workers who are complete strangers for the first few months.

And this fear of working in a place where you can potentially fail is apparently very strong! The author Nihar Chhaya addresses why companies need to know and understand this phenomenon.

The dilemma of fitting in with new colleagues is a widespread problem. Half of all senior-level outside hires fail within the first 18 months, mainly due to an inability to acclimate to the company culture and often due to poor onboarding. And for the newly appointed leader, harmony with coworkers is so desired that as much as 58% of men and 74% of women would refuse a high paying job if it meant not getting along with colleagues.

There are lots of variables that could cause your colleagues to subvert you early in your arrival, and many of those are out of your control. But here are a few strategies you can use to make sure their perceptions don’t diminish your motivation or hinder your success.

by Nihar Chhaya, from Harvard Business Review, December 16, 2020.

Consider that it’s not you they resent, but rather what you represent.

You could have colleagues who applied for your job, but now have to work with an outsider. Or you were hyped-up and your credentials now outshine anything you plan to do.

Create your own advisory board.

“As a new external hire, you may be hesitant to run to your boss or colleagues with every question or concern you have about assimilating within the company culture, in case that comes across as incompetent. But the vast majority of companies practice poor onboarding, and up to 20% of new hires leave within the first 45 days of joining. So you would be doing the company and yourself a favor by being proactive in learning how to avoid potential landmines and missteps as you navigate the company culture.”

“Ask some of the more difficult people around you for ongoing feedback, not only to show a willingness to grow yourself but also to protect yourself against any potential sabotage.”

Co-opt your enemies.

“Their behavior likely has less to do with you than with their insecurities, so consider them as “enemies” worth cultivating influence with, because they may evolve to become useful allies in the future. For instance, you may surprise a colleague who criticizes you behind your back by asking them for their advice and expertise on a work issue. Perhaps publicly compliment them, showing that you are secure enough to raise them and share the spotlight. Such gestures may not only warm them up to you but encourage them to reciprocate in time.”

Own your part.

While the reaction of our peers may be rooted in expectations outside of our control, we can ask for feedback on what we can do to improve our performance. Perhaps in trying to avoid behaviors and reactions from previous jobs, we move 180 degrees in another direction, which can result in the same cool reactions from colleagues and other staff. Listen to your peers and try to find a balance in how you want to be perceived and how you plan to actually work in the environment.

Continue reading Are You Worried That Your New Colleagues Resent You? by Nihar Chhaya, from Harvard Business Review, December 16, 2020.


Join the Mailing List

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.
Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
Joseph Rios, EdD
leadershipandvaluesinaction@gmail.com
I am Joseph Rios and I believe that leadership is an expression of our values
Previous post Assert Yourself Without Being Assertive, and other Lessons I Was Told to Learn
Next post Harvard Business Review: How to Tell Your Boss You’re Burned Out

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply