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Harvard Business Review: Cultivate a Trans Inclusive Workplace

Harvard Business Review: Cultivate a Trans Inclusive Workplace

Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.


Harvard Business Review: Cultivate a Trans Inclusive Workplace

Listen to Cultivate a Trans Inclusive Workplace from the Harvard Business Review IdeaCast podcast

Even when we are working remotely, we can and should be doing intentional work to create a trans inclusive, welcoming and celebratory environment. Katina Sawyer discusses ways managers can move past their unfamiliarity to cultivating the environment as leaders.

Katina Sawyer, assistant professor at the George Washington University, says transgender workers continue to be overlooked even as organizational diversity initiatives become more widespread. Her research shows that many trans employees experience ongoing discrimination, from microaggression to job loss. Sawyer shares effective formal policies and details the informal ways managers can make their workplaces — physical and virtual — truly welcoming for trans people. Sawyer is the author, along with Christian Thoroughgood and Jennica Webster, of the HBR article “Creating a Trans Inclusive Workplace.”

From Cultivate a Trans-Inclusive Workplace, Harvard Business Review IdeaCast podcast

CURT NICKISCH: What do managers currently misunderstand maybe the most about transgender workers?

KATINA SAWYER: I think that the biggest thing that people miss is that they mistake their own lack of familiarity with a population for that population itself being scary or off limits or not something that they should broach. And so I think that one of the things that people are missing, frankly, is recognizing or understanding that it’s okay to start off from a place of not knowing and that asking questions and working collaboratively with people who are in that population to learn and understand and grow is actually a really necessary first step in order to make the workplace more inclusive.

From Cultivate a Trans-Inclusive Workplace, Harvard Business Review IdeaCast podcast

How Those With Power and Privilege Can Help Others Advance HBR IdeaCast

Tsedale Melaku, sociologist at The Graduate Center, City University of New York, and David Smith, professor at the U.S. Naval War College, have been looking at the ways people with the most power in society and organizations can become better allies to those who have less authority and influence. In the United States, that typically means white men helping their female co-workers or colleagues of color to advance. In an era when the push for gender and racial equity is gaining momentum, Melaku and Smith join host Alison Beard in a live taping that includes audience questions about the right ways to call out microaggressions, hold senior management to account, and use majority group privilege to help those in the minority. Melaku and Smith are the coauthors, along with Angie Beeman and Brad Johnson, of the HBR article "Be a Better Ally."
  1. How Those With Power and Privilege Can Help Others Advance
  2. Why Work-From-Anywhere Is Here to Stay

Continue listening to Cultivate a Trans-Inclusive Workplace from the Harvard Business Review IdeaCast podcast


Inside Higher Ed: More Pandemic Consequences for Underrepresented Students

Read More Pandemic Consequences for Underrepresented Students by Greta Anderson, from Inside Higher Ed, September 16, 2020.

As the pandemic rages on, we can’t forget the most vulnerable and at-risk populations on our college campuses. I am committed to sharing what I read and putting it in front of those who can make a difference. In what ways are your targeting resources or doing outreach to identified groups on your campus who might need them?

The Student Experience in the Research University Consortium conducted a comprehensive survey of undergraduate, graduate and professional students from May to July that asked a series of questions about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on their academic and personal lives. The survey, which received responses from about 30,000 undergraduates and 15,000 graduate and professional students, measured student mental healthfinancial stabilityfood and housing insecurity, and their ability to adjust to online learning in the spring, when campuses shut down due to the pandemic.

Research Findings in Brief

By and large, students of color and low-income and working-class students were more likely to have anxiety and depression and to experience food and housing insecurity during the pandemic, and disparities were “remarkably” consistent across both undergraduate and graduate and professional students, Krista Soria, assistant director for research and strategic partnerships for the SERU Consortium said.

Some degree of increased financial instability among students who were already struggling financially was to be expected given the widespread impact that the pandemic has had on the nation’s economy, Soria said. But some survey results, such as the level of food insecurity among all students surveyed, were “alarming,” especially because the sample of students was all from large, public research institutions, which tend to enroll more students from middle-class and higher socioeconomic backgrounds, Soria said.

Soria and Chirikov will be presenting the survey’s findings at two upcoming webinars, one with the NASPA: Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education Center for First-Generation Student Success on Oct. 1 and also on Oct. 6 as part of the American College Personnel Association’s 2020 virtual webinar series.

Continue reading More Pandemic Consequences for Underrepresented Students by Greta Anderson, from Inside Higher Ed, September 16, 2020.


Higheredjobs.com: Micro-Mentoring: How a Small Moment Can Alter Your Career Path

Read Micro-Mentoring: How a Small Moment Can Alter Your Career Path by Charles R. Middleton, from Higheredjobs.com, September 21, 2020

Formal mentoring has been studied and many will speak to its benefits when done correctly. But sometimes, there are moments where a simple conversation – sometimes intentional, sometimes an off-the-cuff remark – can change the direction of your life. I have experienced this more than once, so this blog post spoke to me directly.

I invite you to reflect on one of your vector-changing moments; we all have them. The action that changed your vector should not have seemed very consequential at the time. Think about who was involved other than yourself. What was their role in the circumstances?

The person who ever so slightly changed your vector was engaged in what I now call micro-mentoring. They had many choices at the time on how to deal with you on whatever the issue was, and they chose this one for reasons unknown to you, and it changed your life.

by Charles R. Middleton, from Higheredjobs.com, September 21, 2020

My Own Micro-Mentoring Moments

I can identify three different micro-mentoring moments that shifted how I see myself:

  1. Having lunch with Irene Kendall at Upstairs Commons at the University of Southern California, in 1996, where she told me I should look at student affairs/higher education administration graduate programs. Up until that moment, I hadn’t thought of going to graduate school. But that lunch changed everything.
  2. I had a one-on-one meeting with Lynn Riker while working at the New Jersey Institute of Technology around 2007 when she told me that I didn’t need to learn how to engage in institutional politics, that I did it every day. I just had to pay attention to who had the power in the room and what did they need to either keep it or lose it. It changed how I saw myself as an equal in what felt like an unequal work environment.
  3. After the college where we worked had closed, I had lunch with my former vice president Laura De Veau several months later, where she heaped praise on my skills that would eventually become the backbone of my company, Leadership and Values in Action, LLC. After spending months hunting for a job, it helped me focus on how my skills could help me instead of trying to use them to find a job.

I know that I plan to be more intentional, when speaking with friends and colleagues, to stay in the moment and give as much support as I think they need. Even if they don’t see or know it just yet.

Continue reading Micro-Mentoring: How a Small Moment Can Alter Your Career Path by Charles R. Middleton, from Higheredjobs.com, September 21, 2020


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