0 0
Read Time:6 Minute, 54 Second
Indeed.com: How To Find Your Passion for a More Fulfilling Career

Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.


Indeed.com: How To Find Your Passion for a More Fulfilling Career

Indeed.com: How To Find Your Passion for a More Fulfilling Career

Read How To Find Your Passion for a More Fulfilling Career by Indeed.com, May 24, 2021.

I spent three years doing a job search. Trust me, I know that there are mitigating circumstances that keep people in a job because it pays the bills or to have some finacial stability.

But those aren’t the only choices available to us. Perhaps you have an inkling that your current job isn’t a great fit – but what will be?

Indeed.com offers the following tips for choosing a career that feeds your passion:

How to find your career passion

The best way to identify what you’re passionate about is by paying attention. Each day you are likely excited, interested or satisfied by certain topics, tasks or activities. Let’s take a closer look at what you should look for in your day-to-day life that might bring a passion to light.

There are six steps you can follow to identify your passion:

  1. Look for high points in your day
  2. Pay attention to what you spend your time and money on
  3. Consider topics you love to teach or talk about with others
  4. Think about your strengths
  5. Take the elements apart
  6. Explore career paths

While all of the steps are useful, consider how you would answer Step 2 and Step 3:

2. Pay attention to what you spend your time and money on

We tend to focus our resources on things that are meaningful to us, including time and money. Look at your credit card bill or bank statements and see if there are any themes. Look at the topics of books, magazines, films or podcasts you consume. Take note of how you are spending your free time and what activities bring you joy. Finally, recognize if there is a particular genre, subject or theme that your hobbies and interests have in common. The interests that have remained with you through the years may be more related to a passion versus a newly emerged interest.

3. Consider topics you love to teach or talk about with others

Consider your interactions with others. What types of conversations do you enjoy the most? Do you find yourself particularly animated when talking about a specific subject? It might also be helpful to consider if there are any tasks or topics you tend to teach others about. These are often the things we find most important to us.

Continue reading How To Find Your Passion for a More Fulfilling Career by Indeed.com, May 24, 2021.


Harvard Business Review: The Hazards of a “Nice” Company Culture

Read The Hazards of a “Nice” Company Culture by Timothy R. Clark, from Harvard Business Review, June 25, 2021.

In the words of Stephen Sondheim, from the musical Into The Woods, “Nice is different than good.”

In the workplace, this is especially important. As described by the author, “(W)hat’s touted as niceness is often nothing more than the veneer of civility, a cute nod to psychological safety, a hologram that falsely signals inclusion, collaboration, and high performance.”

I’ve worked in a ‘nice’ organization. Only to learn that this veneer was a shadow for pretty mean-spirited impressions about my work and my longevity in my field.  

The author suggests the following actions to battle this type of disingenuous environment:

Clarify expectations, standards of performance, and meeting types.

Ambiguity feeds toxic niceness, so clarify how you expect people to treat one another and hold each other accountable. Be explicit that you expect intellectual honesty, candid feedback, and tough questions. 

Publicly challenge the status quo you helped create.

Don’t expect others to muscle through the fear and usher in a new era of truth-telling if you haven’t modeled the behavior first. You must be the first mover, demonstrating vulnerability and fallibility, and showing people that candor is rewarded. 

Provide air cover for candor.

When people do have the courage to express dissenting views and speak candidly, protect them. Reduce the risk of ridicule by thanking those who do. As you accommodate dissent, you will gradually recast the norm until it becomes a cultural expectation.

Confront performance problems immediately.

When you don’t address a performance problem, you condone it. And if you hesitate to take action, you create confusion. Hold people accountable privately and respectfully. People who don’t respect these new boundaries have a choice to either adopt the new norm or find a new opportunity. The one thing they won’t do is retire on the job because it’s no longer an option.

We have the power to create a more kind, vulnerable place to work. This fuels trust and allows people to work to their boundaries. And it is possible, so if you can’t create it, find a work environment that values kindness over niceness.

Continue The Hazards of a “Nice” Company Culture by Timothy R. Clark, from Harvard Business Review, June 25, 2021.


TheBalanceCareers.com: 7 Tips About How to Develop a High-Performance Workforce – Hiring

Read 7 Tips About How to Develop a High-Performance Workforce by Susan Heathfield, from TheBalanceCareer.com, January 12, 2019

I am going to focus on the work managers need to improve as a professional skill in order to build stronger teams.

A few years ago, I worked for a vice president who would always credit the work within her division on making smart hiring choices. Having worked through a couple of reorganizations both in this division and in other places, I can attest that smart hiring can make or break an organization. And then give credit to the personnel who are doing the hard work, so they feel motivated to continue doing the hard work.

I learned from her, and other strong senior leaders, that we can improve the organization before issues arise by hiring staff with skills that meet current and future needs. But this can only be done with forethought and trust. Susan Heathfield from The Balance Careers offers the following tips for hiring:

1. Hiring

Create a documented, systematic hiring process. Ensure that you hire the best possible staff for your superior workforce:

  • Define the outcomes desired from the people you hire.
  • Develop job descriptions that clearly outline the performance responsibilities.
  • Develop the largest pool of qualified candidates possible. Search via professional associations, social media networking sites such as LinkedIn, online job boards, personal contacts, employee referrals, university career services offices, search firms, job fairs, newspaper classifieds, and other creative sources when necessary.
  • Devise a careful candidate selection process that includes culture match, testing, behavioral interview questions, customer interviews, and tours of the work area.
  • Perform appropriate background checks that include employment references, employment history, education, criminal records, credit history, drug testing, and more.
  • Make an employment offer that confirms your position as an employer of choice.

What can you do to become an employer of choice?

I believe that it means you have to provide the kind place where staff are valued for their contributions and that through the hiring process, the organization is transparent about what it can and will provide for success. For instance, will the staff have the ability to stop or dismantle “sacred cows” after their own analysis of current needs? Or will they need to face the slings and arrows that everyone must in order to prove their worth?

So many people are hired into a dream organization, but end up in a nightmare. This forces staff to make a new choice to find a new employer – and sometimes leave the field forever.

Put some serious thought into what the candidates will need to be successful to choose you over other organizations.

Continue reading 7 Tips About How to Develop a High-Performance Workforce by Susan Heathfield, from TheBalanceCareer.com, January 12, 2019


Join the Mailing List

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.
Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
Joseph Rios, EdD
leadershipandvaluesinaction@gmail.com
I am Joseph Rios and I believe that leadership is an expression of our values
Previous post ThriveGlobal: Sorry, Not Sorry: Why We Need to Stop Apologizing
Next post New Job, New Career, New Opportunities: Have a Re-Career Plan

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply