0 0
Read Time:9 Minute, 20 Second
Jobscan: Navigating the Job Search After Leaving a Toxic Work Environment

Read Navigating the Job Search After Leaving a Toxic Work Environment by Jessica Nath, from Jobscan.co, May 5, 2021

Read 5 Steps to Finding a Job That Fits Your Mental Health Needs by Jessica Nath, from Jobscan.co, May 25, 2021

Read How to Write a Career Change Resume by Paige Liwanag, from Jobscan.co, May 4, 2021

Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.


Jobscan: Navigating the Job Search After Leaving a Toxic Work Environment

Read Navigating the Job Search After Leaving a Toxic Work Environment by Jessica Nath, from Jobscan.co, May 5, 2021

Jobscan.co is an excellent resource for those looking for jobs in any career. During Mental Health Awareness Month, they shared a number of blog posts for candidates to consider. Author Jessica Nath shared the following sobering statistics:

  • Almost one in five workers said they have experienced a toxic work environment. These experiences include sexual harassment as well as bullying. (CNBC)
  • More than half—55 percent—reported facing “unpleasant and potentially hazardous” conditions at work. (CNBC)
  • Nearly one-quarter of workers said they dread going to work. (SHRM)
  • One in four workers reported feeling disrespected and unvalued at their jobs. (SHRM)
  • 25 percent of workers reported not feeling safe voicing their opinions about work-related issues. (Civility Partners)
  • One in five people also reported leaving their job in the last five years due to culture. (SHRM)

Below are some of the suggestions offered for those experiencing the stress of wanting to leave a bad work environment:

Detoxing after leaving a toxic work environment

After leaving these workplaces, the thought of a job search can feel overwhelming and scary. So where do you start? Pause—that’s what Bentsi-Enchill recommends. Similarly to leaving toxic relationships, parting ways with a toxic workplace can leave you with a bit of baggage you need to first take the time to sort through.

Balancing your detox with your responsibilities

Below are a few questions you can ask yourself to help guide your job search and avoid re-entering a toxic work environment:

  • What do you value about your job/skillset?
  • What did you like about your previous job? Be specific.
  • What did you dislike about your previous job? Again, be specific.
  • What values do you hold when it comes to your work?
  • How would you feel more fulfilled at your job moving forward?
  • Why did you choose to pursue the type of work/industry you are in?

Focus on what you do have control over during the job search. That includes processing what you really want and need from your next job and using that information throughout your job search.

Minimizing stress during the job search

Even a normal job search can feel extremely stressful. There’s so much work that goes into doing it well, and it’s challenging to keep spirits high when facing any amount of rejection. 

Talk to a professional in therapy

Bentsi-Enchill also recommends talking to a therapist, if possible, during the job search. He believes this is especially important if you are recovering from a toxic work environment.

“If you are able to have the space to process things that you are going through—it might be completely unrelated to job searching—that might impact how you show up in your job search,” Bentsi-Enchill said. 

Finding a healthy workplace

After leaving a toxic work environment, the last thing you want to do is rush back into another toxic workplace. That’s why it’s so important to be as intentional as possible when trying to find your next job

“Gaining clarity and figuring out what the ideal work environment would look like should help you be more savvy, more discerning as you move forward.” Bentsi-Enchill said. 

He acknowledges there is a lot we can’t control when it comes to the job search, so it’s important to focus on what you can control.

Continue Navigating the Job Search After Leaving a Toxic Work Environment by Jessica Nath, from Jobscan.co, May 5, 2021


Jobscan: 5 Steps to Finding a Job That Fits Your Mental Health Needs

Read 5 Steps to Finding a Job That Fits Your Mental Health Needs by Jessica Nath, from Jobscan.co, May 25, 2021

During my most recent job search, I actively tried to find work in companies that would challenge me but not make me work against my values and strengths. This was my privilege, because I could filter out work that wasn’t a good fit.

This, however, may lead to others choosing work in areas that taxes their mental health. Nath offers suggestions on how to find a job that does fit your needs:

Define what a “good fit” means

The first step to finding your match is defining your priorities and expectations. And remember: what’s good for others might be bad for you.  

“There are some environments that are great for some individuals and a terrible fit for others,” Ballard said. “A lot of it is about the fit between the employee and the organization and the job itself.”

He said there’s one big question you need to consider when trying to figure out if a company is a good fit: do they have the same kind of values that you hold?

Carefully review the job description

First things first with the actual job search—check the job description. Obvious, right? How else are you going to know what the job entails?

However, when trying to make sure a role will be a good fit for your mental health needs, you need to read between the lines. While reading through the job description, Ballard recommends asking yourself the following questions:

  • How high stress does this job seem?
  • What demands will you face?
  • What does the scheduling look like?

Network to understand the culture

There are no better resources for understanding what it’s like to work at an organization than simply asking current or former employees. 

In order to find clues about this, turn to networking. You don’t need to come right out and ask if the organization is toxic. Instead, ask about current and former employees’ experiences there. A few questions you can ask here include the following:

  • How long have you worked/been working here?
  • What would you say is your favorite part of the organization?
  • What would you say is the most challenging part of working here?

Look for clues on the organizational side

A few ways to search for the organizational clues to a company’s culture include:

  • Do a bit of sleuthing on LinkedIn to evaluate factors such as turnover
  • Look into the benefits of the company—do they provide solid health insurance that covers mental health?
  • Look up employee ratings on websites such as Glassdoor

Interview the interviewer

The last big step to really understanding if an organization is a good fit for your needs is to simply ask the person interviewing you. When it comes to securing a job—especially if you are in a time crunch, bills are looming, and the panic is setting in—it’s easy to forget that you can also interview the hiring manager.

Be polite and professional, but make sure you are upfront about wanting to stay with the company long-term. That means you want to make sure it is a good fit for you as well as you for it. The following questions will help you accomplish this:

  • What is the culture at your organization?
  • What are some of the challenges your business is facing that this role will help?
  • How would you describe your management style?
  • How do you define success in this role?
  • What do you value in an employee? And specifically to this role?

Continue 5 Steps to Finding a Job That Fits Your Mental Health Needs by Jessica Nath, from Jobscan.co, May 25, 2021


Jobscan: How to Write a Career Change Resume

Read How to Write a Career Change Resume by Paige Liwanag, from Jobscan.co, May 4, 2021

In my recent job search, I switched industries – from higher education to nonprofit workforce development. This came with more than a few edits to my resume, so I can attest to how important it is to present your best assets. Author Paige Liwanag offers the following suggestions:

Career Change Resume Objective and Summary Statements

Resume objective statements are rarely used in the modern job search as they tend to focus on the job seeker’s goals rather than tangible accomplishments. In their place, summary statements are typically used. However, a strong resume objective/summary statement hybrid can still be useful for a job seeker changing careers.

When writing your resume objective, turn your focus to the skills that you’ve picked up throughout your current career and explain how you plan to use them in this new industry.

Choosing a Career Change Resume Format

Oftentimes, job seekers choose a functional resume for career change job searches. A functional resume can be appealing because it turns the focus away from work history and toward skills and accomplishments. Sounds perfect, right? A hiring manager might disagree.

functional resume format can make it look like the job seeker has something to hide. A better option for most job applicants making a career change is the hybrid resume (also called a “combination resume”), which still showcases skills and accomplishments but includes a traditional work history in the second half of the document.

Here’s the bottom line when it comes to resume format when changing careers: if you’re staying within the same industry, a hybrid resume will work great for you. If you’re changing careers and industries, you can consider a functional resume format, though the hybrid resume is likely still a better choice.

Use Keywords and Transferrable Skills

Resume keywords are a job seeker’s BFF, but when making a career change, they are like your BFFL (best friend for life). Keywords are where you prove to the hiring manager, and to the applicant tracking system (ATS) they’re using, that you are qualified for the position.

Tailoring is key to a career change resume

For example, a job seeker with a background in journalism might recognize the keyword “writing” in the job description for an advertising position. While this job seeker doesn’t have advertising experience, they do have expert-level writing skills that can transfer over to the new field. This is called a transferable skill.

Transferable skills are any skills that can transfer from one job to another. When switching careers, job duties tend to become irrelevant, since they are very specific to that previous career.

Certain skills, however, can link previous experience with the expectations of a new role. Transferable skills include both hard skills and soft skills, like writing (as mentioned above), multi-tasking, communication, organization, listening, research, and many more.

Continue How to Write a Career Change Resume by Paige Liwanag, from Jobscan.co, May 4, 2021


Join the Mailing List

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.
Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
Joseph Rios, EdD
leadershipandvaluesinaction@gmail.com
I am Joseph Rios and I believe that leadership is an expression of our values
Previous post The Emotional Toll of a Long-Term Job Search: Looking Forward

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply