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Medium.com: The Psychological Superpower of 2020 Is Restraint

Medium.com: The Psychological Superpower of 2020 Is Restraint

Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.


Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.

Medium.com: The Psychological Superpower of 2020 Is Restraint

Read The Psychological Superpower of 2020 Is Restraint by Ayodeji Awosika, from The Forge on Medium.com, December 12, 2018.

The author, Ayodeji Awosika, was onto something back in 2018 with his prediction that we would need to use more restraint in 2020! His approach focused on what would become our divisive world, and he believes the most control we have is on our own reactions, in order to stay focused.

We live in an unrestrained world, one that’s only getting louder, angrier, and more chaotic. But I’ve learned that power and fulfillment don’t come from the debates we win or Twitter rants we go on or problems we try to micromanage for other people. Often, it comes from all the ways we’re able to hold back.

Ayodeji Awosika, from The Forge on Medium.com, December 12, 2018

The author offers 7 tips on how to practice more restraint in our lives:

  1. Don’t use your intelligence to belittle others
  2. Resist groupthink
  3. Stop caring what people think about you
  4. Stop blaming others
  5. Stop waiting for your chance to talk
  6. Stop letting your desires pull you in every direction
  7. Find balance

There are real problems in the world, but there’s also joy to be found. Restraint means making space for both of those facts in your mind. It means striking balances in all that you do: Focus on your career, but don’t make your career your life. Be prudent, but don’t obsess over money. Spend time with your friends and family without worrying about their problems. Clutching on the steering wheel of life gives you the illusion you have control. You don’t, really. Just live.

Ayodeji Awosika, from The Forge on Medium.com, December 12, 2018

Continue reading The Psychological Superpower of 2020 Is Restraint by Ayodeji Awosika, from The Forge on Medium.com, December 12, 2018.


Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.

Medium.com: The Most Likely Way You’ll Get Infected With Covid-19

Read The Most Likely Way You’ll Get Infected With Covid-19 by Dana G Smith, from Elemental on Medium.com, September 16, 2020.

The amount of data we have to process to keep ourselves safe in the midst of a pandemic can be overwhelming. The Elemental magazine series on Medium, Six Months In, has easy to read and understand articles on what scientists and researchers have learned in the last six months. This article, The Most Likely Way You’ll Get Infected With Covid-19, focuses on the practical ways we can keep ourselves safe – and for those working away from home, how to keep yourself safe at work away from home.

There is too much detail to summarize, but I will leave you with this quote: “The important thing on the public side is air handling, reducing the number of people in enclosed indoor spaces, and wearing a mask,” says Nahid Bhadelia, MD, an infectious diseases physician and associate professor at the Boston University School of Medicine. “[Aerosol transmission] explains why indoor settings are so much more important and contribute so much more to new infections than outdoor settings do.”

While outdoor mask-wearing is important, what is more critical is indoor use and minimizing groups meeting indoors in an enclosed space. Follow the series for more information.

Continue reading The Most Likely Way You’ll Get Infected With Covid-19 by Dana G Smith, from Elemental on Medium.com, September 16, 2020.


Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.

Harvard Business Review: How Different Personality Types Cope with an Always-On Culture

Read How Different Personality Types Cope with an Always-On Culture by John Hackston, from Harvard Business Review, June 25, 2020.

I love personality inventories, and I love that someone wrote about how to use the Meyers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) to predict how each type will manage to be always-on during the pandemic! The author, John Hackston, shares research results from a recent study his organization conducted. Based on the four areas of each style, his research found the following results I thought were interesting:

1. Create time and space to switch off.

“If you have extraversion preferences, recharge by doing something active, perhaps with others (even if that happens virtually while you’re social distancing). If working from home, make sure to take breaks. Go for a walk or a run if you can, or do something new and different. Some extraverts find it helpful to leave their devices in another room when they’re de-stressing. Keep in contact with others, and use video, not just voice.

“If you have introversion preferences, recharge by doing something that allows you time to reflect or that you can become absorbed in. Establish a quiet area of your home where you can work and/or retreat to. Try to limit online meetings, but ensure that you have some contact with other people.”

2. Beware of information overload.

“If you have sensing preferences, stop and take a step back. Focus on the big picture; what’s important? To avoid getting lost in the details, keep in touch with other people and ask for their take on the situation. Don’t obsess with getting every little thing right or having a perfect home working environment.

“If you have intuition preferences, stop going through all the possibilities. Ground yourself in the moment. Try one thing at a time, and stick to it; if you are working at home, it can be easy to skip from one idea to another.”

3. Create boundaries.

“If you have thinking preferences, consider your impact on others. For example, read through messages before you send them. The written communications of “thinking” individuals can be very direct and task-focused and may appear terse and impersonal to others. Without the benefit of face-to-face contact, they may be misunderstood.

“If you have feeling preferences, find a balance between supporting others and looking after your own needs. That can be difficult when you are worrying about the impact of the Covid-19 crisis on others, especially if your close friends and family are not around to help. Identify the supports you need and take conscious actions to attain them.”

4. Find a work/life balance that suits you.

“If you have judging preferences, set boundaries with yourself and others regarding when you will and won’t use technology at home — but be flexible when things are urgent. Turning off your devices when you are not working will most likely lower your stress levels, so make it clear to others when you will and won’t be available. If the Covid-19 crisis meant that you suddenly had to change your routines, establish new ones. If you are working at home, keep “work” and “home” separate by having a designated work area and staying away from it outside of working hours.

“If you have perceiving preferences, you might be enjoying some aspects of working from home, such as the freedom to be flexible with your hours. But don’t expect others to necessarily feel the same. Avoid sending emails or requesting chats outside of normal working hours. And allow some time for other activities so that your workdays don’t become overly routine.  Timeboxing, or converting your to-do list into blocks of time on your calendar, might help.”

Continue reading How Different Personality Types Cope with an Always-On Culture by John Hackston, from Harvard Business Review, June 25, 2020.


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