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Higher Ed Jobs: Everything in Your Career Is on Fire

Higher Ed Jobs: Everything in Your Career Is on Fire

Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.


Higher Ed Jobs: Everything in Your Career Is on Fire

Read Everything in Your Career Is on Fire by Justin Zackal, from HigherEdJobs.com, August 27, 2020.

No headline in 2020 has resonated with me like this one!

The premise the author, Justin Zackal in HigherEdJobs.com, shares is that if our house was one fire, what would we do in the five minutes we had to prepare ourselves and move into a triage moment. Many faculty and staff had the same amount of preparation to leave their college campus offices – but how do they prepare for the future in this uncertainty?

The author give four areas that should be revisited and how to try to feel in control of the narrative going on in our professional lives, or as the author suggests “Let’s continue this heuristic by pretending everything related to your career is on fire:”

Your Resume/CV

“Someone just took a lighter to your 20-page CV. You need to salvage your best three experiences to share with employers. “People making evaluations average together the information they get,” wrote Art Markman in his book “Bring Your Brain to Work.” “So three big achievements plus a few lesser accomplishments may actually result in a lower average than three achievements alone.” 

Your Office

“Now your office is on fire. What if you had to retreat to another environment, like online teaching or working at another type of campus? Many people have already adapted to limited or no office access during the coronavirus pandemic, but it was temporary and without the thought of “Poof! It’s gone for good.” After ensuring your physical safety, think about where and with whom you find psychological safety. Where do you feel most productive and which tools do you need? Who in that building will you miss working with the most?”

Your Job

“While still hypothetical, the last two fires are metaphorical. Got it? OK, you’re fired.

“Maybe you were fortunate enough to remain employed after the coronavirus pandemic incurred job loss, furloughs, and hiring freezes across multiple business sectors, not to mention the health hardships and loss of life. Still, many people live in constant fear that the worst will happen to them: what if I lose my job? This anguish will prevent you from doing your best work.

“So, what if losing your job was inevitable? Tell yourself, “They can’t fire me because I resign…to being fired.”

Your Passion

“We end with a good type of fire. Think of a time in your career when something sparked a fire inside you. How can you rekindle that passion elsewhere in your work? Think of the three things you have a burning desire to do, or things that need reigniting in your career, as well as your “power word” describing the action that lights the fuse.”

Continue reading Everything in Your Career Is on Fire by Justin Zackal, from HigherEdJobs.com, August 27, 2020.


Inside Higher Ed: Mindset List Takes New Form

Read Mindset List Takes New Form by Scott Jaschik, from Inside Higher Ed, September 9, 2020.

Beloit College has passed the reigns of the annual Mindset List to Marist College. Taking on a different look and feel, the list is less ‘this is how old the reader feels’ and more ‘this is how the current class looks at the world.’

The list available on the Marist College website also provides additional reading to learn more about each perspective. A much more interesting take on higher ed!

Highlights of the Mindset List

  • Emerging artists and designers in the Class of 2024 will explore race relations beyond Black Lives Matter into a deeper understanding of how whiteness has shaped bias and influence in contemporary American culture.
  • Incoming students are willing to pay for their privacy. Privacy is now a commodity, and they value privacy for their real relationships.
  • The necessity of personal protection equipment (PPE) will drive fashion trends for the next couple of seasons as young designers in the Class of 2024 adapt face masks and other PPE into functional objects of personal expression.
  • Incoming students are keenly aware of the major threats to the health of our society created by both an international pandemic and the global climate crisis, while at the same time, the value of science in our national dialogue is increasingly questioned.
  • Incoming students have never been more ready to embrace social distance by using technology to fill the distance gap. They are always looking for the newest upgrade.

Continue reading Mindset List Takes New Form by Scott Jaschik, from Inside Higher Ed, September 9, 2020.


ACEnet: How Colleges Can (and Can’t) Support 2020 Campaign-Related Activities on Campus and Help Students Vote

Read How Colleges Can (and Can’t) Support 2020 Campaign-Related Activities on Campus and Help Students Vote from the American Council on Education, September 3, 2020.

Even with campuses operating remotely, there are still engagement opportunities that the current campaigns will try to tap into. The American Council on Education has produced a list of activities, Student Voting and College Political Campaign-Related Activities in 2020, that college campus advisors and program planners should keep in mind for the current election cycle. Below is a highlight of some of their suggestions about permissible and impermissible activities.

Student Voting: Permissible

Creating and conducting voting information programing, including online webinars, designed to increase student understanding of the electoral process, or to encourage campus community members, including students, to become involved in the process. Such programming must be nonpartisan in the recruitment of instructors, the advertising or invitation to students, and the curriculum. The program should be widely publicized, although groups underrepresented in the electoral process may be targeted

Student Voting: Impermissible

Conducting voter education activities confined to a narrow range of issues or skewed in favor of certain candidates or a political party. For example, the IRS has disapproved such activities that involved selected voting records of certain incumbents on a narrow range of issues, such as land conservation

Candidate Appearances: Permissible

Providing access to air time on a university-owned radio station on an equal basis to all legally qualified candidates for a public office, in a manner consistent with the limits imposed by Federal Communications Commission standards.

Candidate Appearances: Impermissible

Publishing ratings of the candidates, particularly in situations where the ratings could be viewed as reflecting the views of the institution, or when institutional resources are used to prepare or publish such ratings without reimbursement at the usual and normal charge.

Click h​ere to download a copy of Student Voting and College Political Campaign-Related Activities in 2020.

Continue reading How Colleges Can (and Can’t) Support 2020 Campaign-Related Activities on Campus and Help Students Vote from the American Council on Education, September 3, 2020.


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