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Harvard Business Review: How to Be a Better Ally to Your Black Colleagues

Harvard Business Review: How to Be a Better Ally to Your Black Colleagues

Read How to Be a Better Ally to Your Black Colleagues by Stephanie Creary, from Harvard Business Review, July 8, 2020.

Read Reopening Campuses, Racial Disparities by Kery Murakami, from Inside HigherEd, July 8, 2020. (page 2)

Read How “Different” Will Post-COVID Higher Education Be, Especially for “At-Risk” Students? by Andrew Martinez, from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, July 1, 2020. (page 3)

Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.

Harvard Business Review: How to Be a Better Ally to Your Black Colleagues

Many institutions of higher education are trying to respond to issues of race and racism in the academy, but past experience has told me that rarely do the people impacted the most get to lead the way change will happen. Stephanie Creary presents a framework based on 14 years of research on how departments, organizations, and institutions can develop better responses around issues of race and racism.

“Recently, I developed the LEAP framework, which is designed to help people from different backgrounds build stronger relationships in the workplace. LEAP is based on the idea that relating to people who are different from us takes hard work and can be anxiety-provoking. Yet, doing the necessary work to notice, connect, value, and respond to others’ needs results in more effective working relationships.”

By Stephanie Creary, from Harvard Business Review, July 8, 2020

LListen and learn from your Black colleagues’ experiences.

“Instead of dampening your Black colleagues’ voices and experiences, you can look for opportunities to listen to and learn about their experiences at work. Participating in a company-sponsored town halls focused on race in the workplace is one good option. Attending your company’s employee resource group (ERG) meetings for Black employees is another.”

E: Engage with Black colleagues in racially diverse and more casual settings.

“If your company does not have an ERG for black employees, consider joining an online community where personal experiences about race are being openly discussed and facilitated by experts.”

A: Ask Black employees about their work and their goals.

“To improve the quality of your relationships with your Black colleagues, ask them about their actual work, including what they are hoping to accomplish, any concerns they have about doing that, and how you might be able to help them reach their vision.”

P: Provide your Black colleagues with opportunities, suggestions, encouragement, and general support.

“To support your Black colleagues, amplify their experiences — the good and the bad. Recommend them for highly visible opportunities. Volunteer to provide them with feedback on their work. Introduce them to influential colleagues. Openly acknowledge their accomplishments to others. Reward them for doing DEI work alongside their formal work. And most, of all, share their more challenging experiences with those who have the capacity to create systemic change.”

I believe that when we listen to Black, Indigenous and other People of Color as they describe the environment, we must fight back from our create yet another task force or diversity initiative. Often the solutions are based on how we treat people, empower power, and embolden people.

Continue reading How to Be a Better Ally to Your Black Colleagues by Stephanie Creary, from Harvard Business Review, July 8, 2020.


Inside HigherEd: Reopening Campuses, Racial Disparities

Read Reopening Campuses, Racial Disparities by Kery Murakami, from Inside HigherEd, July 8, 2020.

I am a proud two-time graduate from the University of Southern California. And I am proud that my alma mater knows and understands its role in protecting its most vulnerable populations, from staff, faculty and students – and the largely people of color who work in support roles throughout the institution.

“With Congress beginning to consider another coronavirus relief package, Shaun R. Harper called on the House higher education subcommittee to earmark money for colleges to protect front-line campus workers such as custodians and food service workers who are disproportionately Black and Latino.

“People of color have been unequally infected by the deadly virus, said Harper, a USC provost professor and president of the American Educational Research Association. Not taking action “places people of color and their family members they live with at greater risk,” he told lawmakers during a hearing on the needs of colleges during the pandemic.”

by Kery Murakami, from Inside HigherEd, July 8, 2020.

Institutions, like USC, which both enroll students of color and employ large numbers of people of color across the campus, might be unprepared for increased need for mental health services to help staff and students manage the enduring nature of the crisis in their homes and neighborhoods. In addition, people from Black and Latino groups are more likely to know someone who has died from COVID-19 and may experience extended periods of sadness and depression while the ‘normal’ operations start again.

“And given that more than half of college football and basketball players for teams in major conferences are Black, he said resuming those sports “places Black undergraduate men at disproportionate risk of COVID-19 infection.”

With increased calls by the White House to restart full operations of colleges and universities, institutions will have a tough call to make in how they welcome students back – if at all – and how these plans will address the needs of the most vulnerable members of the community.

Continue reading Reopening Campuses, Racial Disparities by Kery Murakami, from Inside HigherEd, July 8, 2020.


Diverse Issues in Higher Education: How “Different” Will Post-COVID Higher Education Be, Especially for “At-Risk” Students

Read How “Different” Will Post-COVID Higher Education Be, Especially for “At-Risk” Students? by Andrew Martinez, from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, July 1, 2020.

What does support look like, post COVID-19, for students impacted the most by the pandemic? In what ways does your institution plan to support them, either with continued programs or with new, innovative programs? Research scholar Dr. Andrew Martinez from Rutgers University in New Jersey writes about this topic in Diverse Issues in Higher Education.

At a time where our nation struggles to confront the pervasive racism that plagues this country, we must also recognize the racial disparities that exist among our campuses too. It is not a coincidence that most low-income, first-generations students also identify as Black or as an underrepresented ethnic minority. Furthermore, the racial make-up of faculty depicts another disparity that higher education has the tools to fix but not the leadership to enact change.

We also must consider power, privilege and how the campus environment itself immortalizes the complicated and problematic history that plagues many of our institutions and allows racism to manifest in ways that prevent minoritized students the ability to ever truly feel welcomed. As we see local, state, and federal governments reconsider statues of historical figures that have a complicated, racist history, I wonder if higher education institutions will follow suit? Will the increasing number of ethnically diverse students entering college today have to constantly confront images and monuments of figures who believed that they did not deserve the right to enter those spaces in the first place?

by Andrew Martinez, from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, July 1, 2020

Continue reading How “Different” Will Post-COVID Higher Education Be, Especially for “At-Risk” Students? by Andrew Martinez, from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, July 1, 2020.


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