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HigherEdJobs.com: How to Lead with Emotional Intelligence During Hard Times

HigherEdJobs.com: How to Lead with Emotional Intelligence During Hard Times

Read How to Lead with Emotional Intelligence During Hard Times by Eileen Hoenigman Meyer from HigherEdJobs.com, July 23, 2020.

Read Communicating Risks to Foster Compliance by Lindsay McKenzie from Inside Higher Ed, July 28, 2020.

Read Three Tips for First-Generation Graduate Students Navigating Education During the Pandemic by Stella Smith and Leslie Ekpe from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, July 27, 2020.

Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.


WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday

HigherEdJobs.com: How to Lead with Emotional Intelligence During Hard Times

Read How to Lead with Emotional Intelligence During Hard Times by Eileen Hoenigman Meyer from HigherEdJobs.com, July 23, 2020.

I keep reading social media posts from friends who are also parents, who share the challenges they face trying to manage continuing work from home orders and the expectations to send children back to school this fall. There are still millions of unemployed people in the US, dealing with COVID-19 and it’s lingering impact on families and the economy. And lest we forget about politics, identities at risk for violence, and any multitude of issues, well you say we are facing hard times.

So how do we help people we work with during hard times when we’re facing them too? Eileen Hoenigman Meyer shares how to lead with emotional intelligence as a strategy to help staff know they are being heard, even when there are no clear solutions.

Leading from an Informed Place

Being an emotionally intelligent leader requires a good understanding of your own emotions coupled with a good internal and external vocabulary. This way, you can identify what you’re feeling and talk about it with care and fluency, choosing the appropriate audience with whom to share your feelings. This can be hard for leaders, because the higher you ascend, the smaller that audience becomes. Obviously, it’s not appropriate to reflect on your feelings of anxiety, fear, stress, etc. with junior staff members. You want to be their rock instead of asking them to assume a support position for you.

Empathy Always
You’re an authority figure in the lives of the team you lead. They care about what you say. They are assured by what you share. They are worried and uncomfortable on many fronts and in unprecedented ways.

Because your team is worried, they are listening to you deeply, desperately. Know that. Plan for it, and be with your team in their worry. This is a time that demands community, which starts with our willingness to truly understand each other. 

Listen 
People are struggling in so many ways. One of the best ways to be with people in their pain is to allow them to tell you about it. Let them share their struggles if they need to, without trying to mask their concern. These times are hard. Much is uncertain.

There’s a lot that you can’t fix, but you can listen. While it may be complicated by remote interaction, checking in, following up, and inviting conversation with the people you lead is a helpful strategy. 

by Eileen Hoenigman Meyer from HigherEdJobs.com, July 23, 2020

I believe the last part of the article should be our guide for the next few months and years: “Be the leader who stands with them in their pain. Those are the leaders we need. Those are the leaders we never forget.”

Continue reading How to Lead with Emotional Intelligence During Hard Times by Eileen Hoenigman Meyer from HigherEdJobs.com, July 23, 2020.


Inside Higher Ed: Communicating Risks to Foster Compliance

Read Communicating Risks to Foster Compliance by Lindsay McKenzie from Inside Higher Ed, July 28, 2020.

Normally I try to highlight interesting passages but in truth, the entire article was interesting. Take a look below:

Colleges are already setting expectations and encouraging students to follow the rules when they return. Some institutions, such as the University of South Carolina, are asking students to pledge (and share using the #IPledgeColumbia hashtag) that they will do what they can to protect themselves and the people around them. Some institutions are warning students they may be punished if they are caught breaking the rules. Some are trying to educate students on the science behind the virus, hoping the more they understand, the less likely they are to engage in risky behavior. Hennessy said many institutions are taking a combination of these approaches.

by Lindsay McKenzie from Inside Higher Ed, July 28, 2020.

I worked as a residence life coordinator for a few years, so I know how hard it is to get students to understand the importance of following rules for their own safety. Often parents have the best ways to motivate their students to comply with policies, but only when parents are listening to their student’s worries and concerns.

[Rita Manfredi, an emergency physician at George Washington University Hospital], who has a son who is preparing to go to college, recommends that families sit down for a “dinner table discussion” before students go back to campus. Parents should talk about safety measures, such as masks, social distancing, hand washing and regularly disinfecting surfaces. “Ventilation is also really important,” said Manfredi. She encourages students to open windows in their dorm rooms and instructors to hold classes outside, if possible. In addition to these measures, Manfredi wants families to discuss what should happen in the event that someone becomes seriously ill.

While uncomfortable, discussions about advance care planning are important and signify how seriously students should take COVID-19, said Manfredi. When young people end up intensive care, their parents often have no idea what their child’s wishes might be, which can cause a lot of stress and uncertainty about how to proceed, said Manfredi. It is a good idea for young people to know their parents’ wishes, too, she said.

“Students need to understand this is not just a flu.”

by Lindsay McKenzie from Inside Higher Ed, July 28, 2020.

Continue reading Communicating Risks to Foster Compliance by Lindsay McKenzie from Inside Higher Ed, July 28, 2020.


Diverse Issues in Higher Education: Three Tips for First-Generation Graduate Students Navigating Education During the Pandemic

Read Three Tips for First-Generation Graduate Students Navigating Education During the Pandemic by Stella Smith and Leslie Ekpe from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, July 27, 2020.

First-generation graduates who are trying to navigate graduate school have the same issues that first-time college students face when going to college – trying to navigate systems designed for people in the know and working through personal challenges and barriers that keep them from focusing on their immediate and long-term success. We can’t forget this cohort of students as we develop strategies to retain students through the pandemic and beyond. Authors Stella Smith and Leslie Ekpe offer three tips to help first-gen grad students be successful.

Although the need to minimize the spread of COVID-19 is clear, colleges and universities’ closures have left many students, particularly those with a low-income intersectional background, with tough decisions to make.

Between being forced to move off-campus, navigating sophisticated resources to obtain the necessary materials to finish the semester from home, food insecurity, and numerous other obstacles, many students are being forced to make decisions that will have a significant impact on their educational, professional, and personal goals forever.

by Stella Smith and Leslie Ekpe from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, July 27, 2020

Tip #1: Use your Campus Support Services

It’s important to remember that you are not in this alone. Please don’t be afraid to reach out to your institution’s support services during this time if you require additional help or resources to be successful. Please make sure you are in consistent communication with your support system, whomever that might be. Your community will provide you with the critical support needed during times of uncertainty.

Tip #2: Be Aware of Your Mental Health

If you feel worried and nervous regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, you are not alone. Many students are already feeling elevated rates of tension and anxiety than average. Ensure that you are taking steps to protect your mental health, whether that be a quiet time, social time, taking a break from social media, etc.

Tip #3: Don’t Fall Victim to Productivity Shaming

Do not allow yourself to be caught in the notion that you must be doing more during these times. Academia often supports a “grind until you make it” mindset that leaves little room for rest. Productivity shaming prevents you from ever feeling like you’re doing “enough,” during which you are sheltering at home. I also recommend that you learn to be decisive in how you spend your time. Develop a system that helps you to decide when you have done enough for the day and can walk away feeling content, fulfilled, and ready to dive right in the next day. Take your time as that work will be there tomorrow.

Continue reading Three Tips for First-Generation Graduate Students Navigating Education During the Pandemic by Stella Smith and Leslie Ekpe from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, July 27, 2020.


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