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Inc.com: 5 Strategies to Keep Moms--and Everyone Else--on Staff From Quitting
Inc.com: 5 Strategies to Keep Moms–and Everyone Else–on Staff From Quitting

Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.


Inc.com: 5 Strategies to Keep Moms--and Everyone Else--on Staff From Quitting

Inc.com: 5 Strategies to Keep Moms–and Everyone Else–on Staff From Quitting

Read 5 Strategies to Keep Moms–and Everyone Else–on Staff From Quitting by Kimberly Weisul, from Inc.com, May 7, 2021.

To say I don’t comprehend the struggle of parents working from home with children is an understatement. But I think that’s an important realization: my lack of understanding shouldn’t stop me from providing the best environment for others to continue caring for others. It could be children, sick and elderly parents, or a temporary need to care for someone unrelated.

Below are five strategies learned from the work-from-home strategies that many companies and organizations were able to institute. While these remedies may have been temporary, they don’t need to be. Some industries may require a return to the previous status quo. But can you implement one or more of these?

1. Keep working from home, mostly

“There’s no doubt that the pandemic has had lasting effects on attitudes about remote work. While only 13 percent of companies say they’re giving up their offices for good, only 17 percent plan to go back to the office full time. And a number of entrepreneurs say this sort of flexibility is exactly what working parents need.”

2. Stay flexible with schedules and time on the job

Founder Lindsey Michaelides realized her staff needed total flexibility, even though her customers were accustomed to near-instantaneous response times.

“Michaelides started by trying to reset customer expectations, letting them know that any message not marked “urgent” might have a 24-hour turnaround time. As a company that was started to support parents, she explained, it needed to make this change to support the parents on its own staff. “The customers were amazing,” says Michaelides. “We got applause.” It’s a relief for the employees, too, says Michaelides: “It gives them total control.”

3. Work smarter, with batch processing and asynchronous communication

“Christy MacGregor realized the inventory and refund requests weren’t actually urgent. So why not handle them all at once? “A lot of this can be batch processed more efficiently,” she says. The pandemic has forced us to become more efficient and find better ways to work,” says MacGregor. “We definitely want to continue that.” 

4. Limit meetings

“All-hands meetings went from weekly to biweekly to quarterly. Team meetings, which used to take place weekly, are now every other week. “Do we need the all-hands meetings?” Michaelides wonders. “Or can we keep up the cultural health of the organization if we move it to Slack?”

5. Support mental health days

“A few founders said they are reinforcing the idea of mental health days. Even with so-called unlimited vacation, they say, employees are reluctant to take time off. So they’re assigning everyone mental health days, often once a quarter, on a use-it-or-lose-it basis. All staffers are expected to take them, which helps remove some of the stigma that employees might feel if they’re perceived to be struggling.”

Continue 5 Strategies to Keep Moms–and Everyone Else–on Staff From Quitting by Kimberly Weisul, from Inc.com, May 7, 2021.


Are You Keeping Your DE&I Commitments?

SHRM News: Are You Keeping Your DE&I Commitments?

Read Are You Keeping Your DE&I Commitments? by Kathy Gurchiek, from SHRM News, May 10, 2021

The motto for my own company is “I believe leadership is an expression of our values.” But others can only know our values as they are put into action.

So values without action are just wishes and hopes. Nothing really to speak about. And certainly nothing that reflects our goals.

Last summer, when many companies were forced to take hard looks at their contribution to racial inequity in the workplace, many diversity, equity and inclusion plans were put into place. Since then, what type of success have some had?

Well that depends.

According to author Kathy Gurchiek , we should consider the example of Netflix:

“Netflix added inclusion as a cultural value in 2017 but found, she wrote, “we weren’t as great as we thought we were or aspired to be. And over these last two years, our inclusion team has been building a foundation, sowing the seeds for inclusion to take root within the company.” 

“It reviewed the race and ethnicity demographics of its U.S. employees, including its leaders, and found that the number of Black employees doubled in the last three years to 8 percent of its workforce and 9 percent of those at the director level and above.

“However, “we could do a much better job at recruiting Hispanic or Latinx, Indigenous, and other underrepresented folks into all areas of our company, particularly our leadership,” Myers wrote. “We want to go beyond charting demographics and hiring goals by looking at the entire employee experience. Hiring is important, for sure, but so is retention, promotion, tenure, and compensation among underrepresented colleagues.”

Tips for Keeping Your Commitment 

Below are ways your company can maintain or improve its commitment to DEI work, based on suggestions from AmyJo Mattheis, founder and chief executive officer of Pavo Navigation Coaching

  • Be honest. Acknowledge that what’s been done before has not worked. Start anew and set old tools and training aside.
  • Accept that change takes time. 
  • Expect and embrace mistakes, and learn from them. “It’s going to require a whole new commitment to how we listen and hear each other and let each other know we have heard each other,” Mattheis said. “Everybody is terrified of saying the wrong thing, and all that does is keep us separate and quiet. It doesn’t help us understand each other at all. We need to learn to have those conversations.” 
  • Increase budgets internally. “What would happen if you would internally invest the same amount of money in your culture” to create an environment that is not racist, that promotes gender equity, and is inclusive of people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer?
  • Establish diversity key performance indicators with clear, achievable, and measurable goals and review progress quarterly just as you would with any other sector of the business. 
  • Keep your pledge or promise as a regular agenda item on all leadership meetings. Mattheis recommended that diversity should be part of every business decision the company makes. “The key is that it has been a vision that is held by the CEO or top three team leads,” she said.

Continue Are You Keeping Your DE&I Commitments? by Kathy Gurchiek, from SHRM News, May 10, 2021


10 Ways You’re Probably Leaving Money on the Table at Work

Payscale.com: 10 Ways You’re Probably Leaving Money on the Table at Work

Read 10 Ways You’re Probably Leaving Money on the Table at Work by Gina Belli, from Payscale.com

As a first-generation college graduate, and the first in my family to work a white collar job, there was much I didn’t understand about the working world. I watched my family save vacation hours for years, preferring to take bigger vacations than small, weekend excursions. They stayed at the same company for years and years, rising through the ranks for coveted management roles. And they certainly didn’t have retirement funds through their jobs.

I had much to learn, and still more to learn. But I am aware that others may always be in the same position. Some of these tips may seem simple. Like taking time off. But the work ethic of many first-gen folks is that taking time off may demonstrate something negative – like inability to handle the work or feeling the need to always prove worth in the workplace.

But our peers take full advantage of these perks – all worth money – and still stick around. Adopting some of these behaviors may put us on equal footing and maybe even help us manage the stress of trying to figure out this work culture at the same time.

Below are tips from Gina Belli from Payscale.com:

  1. Save Your Receipts
  2. Take Time Off
  3. Maximize Employer Matching for Retirement
  4. Negotiate Salary
  5. Take Advantage of Optional Wellness Perks
  6. Go Back to School
  7. Accept Opportunities to Advance
  8. Go to the Doctor
  9. Avoiding the Desire to Stay in the Same Place
  10. Don’t Work When You Should Play

My biggest tip I learned: write off any professional development that isn’t covered by your employer on your taxes. And track every single working lunch (or any meal) where you talk shop – the IRS allows you to claim those too.

Continue 10 Ways You’re Probably Leaving Money on the Table at Work by Gina Belli, from Payscale.com


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Joseph Rios, EdD
leadershipandvaluesinaction@gmail.com
I am Joseph Rios and I believe that leadership is an expression of our values
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