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LinkedIn News: How to Fight Off Feeling like a Fraud During Your Job Search

Read How to fight off feeling like a fraud during your job search by Andrew Seaman, from LinkedIn News, July 20, 2020.

Listen to Planning, Adjusting and Communicating for the Fall? from Inside Higher Ed Podcast, July 14, 2020.

Read Dealing with Uncertainty During the Coronavirus Pandemic by Lawrence Robinson and Melinda Smith, from Helpguide.org, April 2020.

Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.

LinkedIn News: How to Fight Off Feeling like a Fraud During Your Job Search

Read How to fight off feeling like a fraud during your job search by Andrew Seaman, from LinkedIn News, July 20, 2020.

In late 2018, I had a networking meal with a dean of students in the city where I live, who told me about a position he thought I should apply for within his division. Since the position and office were new, I wasn’t sure what I was looking for so I applied for a job that sounded similar to the one he described.

Turned out it wasn’t a student affairs job, but instead a provost-level position for another newly created department. It scared me to death to think I was a candidate for a position outside my expertise and level of comfort. But I never felt I had anything to lose each time I made it through a round of interviews until I was a finalist for the position. I just answered as authentically as possible.

Ultimately the position was offered to someone else, but I was okay with that. Because I took away something more valuable: when I get out of my head and speak to my strengths, I can shine. I can compete with candidates who are as equally qualified and when the right job comes along, I could get it.

The author, Andrew Seaman, writes about how to combat the imposter or fraud syndrome some face when trying to advance our careers.

“One way imposter syndrome hurts job seekers is by keeping them from taking risks, Orbé-Austin told me. People dealing with the phenomenon may watch great jobs pass them by because they underestimate their abilities. Also, people will often stay in toxic jobs or fail to seek out better opportunities because they feel fortunate to have their current position, which they often don’t feel qualified to hold.”

by Andrew Seaman, LinkedIn News, July 20, 2020

These negative self-perpetuated thoughts can have a tight grip on our self-view. Seaman offers a few tips on how to deal with the imposter syndrome during the job search process based on the work of Richard Orbé-Austin,:

Know What You Know

A useful exercise to combat imposter syndrome is to counteract some of your doubts with evidence.

“We talk about objectively categorizing the accomplishments and achievements you have to counteract some of the negative thoughts that you have about yourself,” said Orbé-Austin.

Good Enough Growth

“Good enough is what you should strive for,” said Orbé-Austin. He added that people should also embrace the fact that they can still improve in various areas of their lives since that’s a normal part of life.

As an example, finding a new job within a month shouldn’t be your goal. The reality is that job searches often take longer and a number of factors — some outside your control — can determine success. You may experience a resurgence of imposter syndrome when that month passes and you don’t have a job. You may feel it’s proof that you’re not good enough.

Instead, focus on goals centered around the key elements of a successful job search. Set a goal to spend a certain amount of time on networking, for example. Or, set a goal centered on researching your target companies or corporations.

Imperfect Applications

You should also know how to combat feelings of inadequacy that may hold you back from applying to jobs. Many times people will not submit applications because they don’t meet all of the skills or requirements listed in the job description.

In addition to networking being generally beneficial to your job search, Orbé-Austin said asking people in your field or at your target companies about their applications will likely show you that people rarely meet all the criteria in job descriptions when they’re hired.

Focus on Support

People in the middle of a job search should also seek out a strong network of support, said Orbé-Austin. The network can include mentors and other people you can turn to for help with your resume, interviews and networking. Those people can help provide guidance and reality checks.

Also, you should focus on building support into your job search through self-care. “Being able to incorporate self-care strategies where you’re filling your tank constantly and consistently, and not getting into a mode where imposter syndrome can creep up is key,” he said.

Read How to fight off feeling like a fraud during your job search by Andrew Seaman, from LinkedIn News, July 20, 2020.


Inside Higher Ed: Planning, Adjusting and Communicating for the Fall?

Listen to Planning, Adjusting and Communicating for the Fall? from Inside Higher Ed Podcast, July 14, 2020.

Listen to University of Kentucky president and expert on public health policy, Eli Capilouto, speak about his institution’s plans for the fall. Very insightful from a public health expert.

Ep. 27: The State of Student Transfer The Key with Inside Higher Ed

Student transfer is down this fall, with new data from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center showing the anticipated influx of students transferring to community colleges from four-year institutions didn't happen.To make sense of these numbers, we spoke Iris Palmer, a senior advisor for higher education and workforce with the education policy program at New America. Palmer talked about state policies and incentives to help students transfer more seamlessly.We also spoke with Alison Kadlec, a founding partner with Sova, an organization that works on transfer and student success. Kadlec describe how colleges typically have treated transfer students, and what the enrollment crunch most institutions now face could mean for that dynamic.This episode is sponsored by Pearson. Educators around the world rely on the trusted content and digital learning resources from Pearson to improve outcomes in face-to-face or hybrid learning environments. Visit Pearson for all of your online teaching resources, at go.Pearson.com/teachingonline.
  1. Ep. 27: The State of Student Transfer
  2. Ep. 26: Financing Career College Pathways

Listen to Planning, Adjusting and Communicating for the Fall? from Inside Higher Ed Podcast, July 14, 2020.


Helpguide.Org: Dealing with Uncertainty During the Coronavirus Pandemic

Read Dealing with Uncertainty During the Coronavirus Pandemic by Lawrence Robinson and Melinda Smith, from Helpguide.org, April 2020.

Higher education is an industry that values a well-planned year – one that has safeguards against deviation and rewards those who meet established outcomes.

And then we have higher education happening in the middle of a pandemic.

There is so much uncertainty, with different experiences happening city to city, state to state, institution to institution. You can’t look at your peers for what to do, since they are using the same data and might come up with an entirely different solution that might not work for you. That level of sustained uncertainty can and will take its toll on our emotional health. Below are five tips on how to continue managing the uncertainty that is going to last for the indefinite future.

Tip 1: Take action over the things you can control

By focusing on the aspects of a problem that you can control in this way, you’ll switch from ineffective worrying and ruminating into active problem-solving. Of course, all circumstances are different and you may find that in some situations all you can control is your attitude and emotional response.

Tip 2: Challenge your need for certainty

You can challenge the behaviors you’ve adopted to alleviate the discomfort of uncertainty by asking yourself the following questions:

  1. What are the advantages of certainty? What are the disadvantages?
  2. How much can you be absolutely certain about in life?
  3. Do you assume bad things will happen just because an outcome is uncertain? What is the likelihood they will?

By challenging your need for certainty, you can begin to let go of negative behaviors, reduce stress and worry, and free up time and energy for more practical purposes.

Tip 3: Learn to accept uncertainty

When irrational fears and worries take hold, it can be hard to think logically and accurately weigh up the probability of something bad happening. To help you become more tolerant and accepting of uncertainty, the following steps can help:

  1. Identify your uncertainty triggers.
  2. Recognize when you feel the need for certainty.
  3. Allow yourself to feel the uncertainty.
  4. Let go
  5. Shift your attention

Accepting uncertainty doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have a plan for some of life’s unforeseen circumstances. It’s always good to have some savings put by in case of unexpected expenses, keep a preparedness kit handy if you live in an area at risk for earthquakes or hurricanes, or have a plan if you or a loved one falls ill. But you can’t prepare for every possible scenario. Life is simply too random and unpredictable.

Tip 4: Focus on the present

Uncertainty is often centered on worries about the future and all the bad things you can anticipate happening. It can leave you feeling hopeless and depressed about the days ahead, exaggerate the scope of the problems you face, and even paralyze you from taking action to overcome a problem.

You can learn to purposely focus your attention on the present through mindfulness. With regular practice, mindfulness can help change your preoccupation with future worries to a stronger appreciation of the present moment—as well as help calm your mind, ease stress, and boost your overall mood.

Tip 5: Manage stress and anxiety

Taking steps to reduce your overall stress and anxiety levels can help you interrupt the downward spiral of negative thoughts, find inner calm, and better cope with the uncertainty in your life.

  1. Get moving.
  2. Make time for relaxation.
  3. Get plenty of sleep.
  4. Eat a healthy diet

Read Dealing with Uncertainty During the Coronavirus Pandemic by Lawrence Robinson and Melinda Smith, from Helpguide.org, April 2020.


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