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Inside Higher Ed: Implicit Bias Training for Woke Faculty (A Satire)

Inside Higher Ed: Implicit Bias Training for Woke Faculty (A Satire)
Inside Higher Ed: Implicit Bias Training for Woke Faculty (A Satire)

Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.

Inside Higher Ed: Implicit Bias Training for Woke Faculty (A Satire)

Read Implicit Bias Training for Woke Faculty by Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstadt, from Inside Higher Ed, July 10, 2020.

For anyone who has ever had to do diversity or bias training in higher ed (or some similar industry), here is a great satire from Reshmi Dutt-Ballterstadt to hopefully make you chuckle. It is a memo from Provost JollyMolly Daft addressed to white faculty about Implicit Bias Training for Our Woke Faculty. Enjoy!

The training is being sponsored by the Department of Liberal Studies and will be run by your very own. The faculty members from Black, Indigenous and people of color (BIPOC) communities (whom you have previously gaslighted for bringing to your attention various implicit biases) will be your trainers. It will be their privilege (which they do not take lightly) to make you aware (once again) that your implicit biases are actually quite explicit.

Your faculty trainers have set some ground rules:

You will all be muted and can only be unmuted if you have anything meaningful to contribute. “Meaningful” does not mean that you start giving a long testimony about all the antiracist books you have read (based on The New York Times’ antiracist book list) or start quoting James Baldwin (from brainyquote.com).

You are also strictly prohibited from retelling that story about how you cried when the POC student shared with you her experiences with racism during a horse-riding trip in Napa.

Finally, if you are Becky, Karen, Susan, Chad or Kyle, you will be placed in a separate breakout room to just observe, fume and explode. The provost is organizing a boot camp with Jane Elliott for you all!

by Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstadt, from Inside Higher Ed, July 10, 2020.

Continue reading Implicit Bias Training for Woke Faculty by Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstadt, from Inside Higher Ed, July 10, 2020.


Diverse Issues in Higher Education: How Can Professors Bring Anti-Racist Pedagogy Practices Into the Classroom?

Read How Can Professors Bring Anti-Racist Pedagogy Practices Into the Classroom? by Sara Weissman, from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, August 25, 2020.

Being “woke” in the academy might be funny in a satire piece, like the one above, but it is no laughing matter. I thought it would be important to highlight how professors can introduce anti-racist pedagogy into the classroom. Sara Weissman wrote about this topic and the scholars who are attempting to do this work:

After Black Lives Matter protests this summer and yet another police shooting of a Black man – Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin on Sunday – college students want to talk about racism. And faculty across disciplines are trying to figure out how to facilitate those conversations in their real and virtual classrooms.

A new guide on anti-racist pedagogy could help. Released on Tuesday by Packback, an online discussion platform, the guide compiles strategies for educators to foster meaningful, reflective discussions about race with their students, based on interviews with three scholars.

An associate professor of cultural and media studies in African American studies at Ohio University, Dr. Akil Houston hopes the handbook will encourage faculty to get “comfortable with being uncomfortable,” he said, especially scholars in fields that might see conversations about racism as beyond their purview.

“I think the times call for us to say, ‘Let’s put some boots on the ground and engage from where we are, as we continue to learn, as we develop the tools and strategies to have these conversations in our classrooms,” he said.

The goal is, a decade from now, “when people think about the guide, they’ll say, ‘Oh, it’s irrelevant. It’s outdated,’ because we’ve moved as a society and as scholars …” Houston said. Reflecting on the latest shooting, “it doesn’t look like that’s going to be the case, but ultimately I do hope we collectively do our jobs well enough that we’re not having these conversations five, ten years down the road, that we’ve actually moved forward and we’ve progressed beyond this moment.”

by Sara Weissman, from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, August 25, 2020

The free guide is available by visiting Packback.

Continue reading How Can Professors Bring Anti-Racist Pedagogy Practices Into the Classroom? by Sara Weissman, from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, August 25, 2020.


Harvard Business Review: How Brands Can Follow Through on the Values They’re Selling

Read How Brands Can Follow Through on the Values They’re Selling by Latia Curry, from Harvard Business Review, August 26, 2020.

Values statements are useless without putting in the work to making them real. Commitment requires time, effort, and energy – even commitment to values like diversity, equity and inclusion. With company after company making explicit inclusion statements in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests during the summer, we should begin to see big changes by now, right?

Not quite so.

Companies still need to learn how to take these statements and put them into their everyday work, both in the product they develop and the talent they hire to develop them. Latia Curry describes how these companies and brands – including higher education – can follow through on the values they are selling. Below are some highlights from the article:

Living Their Values

“To make structural investment, a company must consistently dedicate time and resources into making change both externally and internally in a given issue area. A company cannot, for example, decide that it wants to invest in racial equity and expect to make structural change overnight. Rather, the company must first infuse equity into their internal operations, values, and mission before taking a public stand, lest they be accused of hypocrisy.”

Owning Their Position

“The same progress has not been made for entities like NASCAR or Twitter. Though both took powerful recent actions, including NASCAR banning Confederate flags from races and Twitter flagging President Trump’s tweets, declaring Juneteenth a company holiday, and donating to the cause, neither brand has a similarly established record of social engagement. While they get credit for their response — for “Owning Their Position” —  they still have work to do and credibility to establish if they want to move along the Brand Advocacy Map’s X-axis.”

Swing and a Miss

“Not only did the [Starbucks] respond by closing more than 8,000 stores for racial bias training, but it pledged significant internal policy reform as well. While imperfect, it is clear that Starbucks is doing more than paying lip-service. The company is repeatedly engaging and trying to get it right — on this topic and others, including climate change and sustainability. We believe it has been rewarded for that engagement through customer loyalty.”

Companies Can Do Better

“Regardless of their position on the map, companies must move beyond statements toward actually making change. While every company is unique in their needs, we believe all successful brand impact campaigns or reactions must include:”

  • Ensuring your house is in order before going big on public actions. Your internal culture and diversity should match your external posture. If it doesn’t — change starts there.
  • If your house is not in order, being humble is key. Acknowledge where there have been missteps and be transparent about your plan for change.
  • Understanding that public statements of support are not enough. Successful public statements admit where you have fallen short, share the actions you are planning — and implement those actions.
  • Investing in structural change. Acknowledge your role in perpetuating power structures and actively work to dismantle them.
  • Donating to those doing the work. While you strategize brand actions and commitments, fund those who have been on the ground working to uproot systemic injustice. However, companies cannot catapult themselves into the top-right or top-left quadrants by simply throwing money at an issue. In other words, companies cannot simply donate money and expect to be publicly rewarded. Instead they need to put time into the previous three actions as well.

Continue reading How Brands Can Follow Through on the Values They’re Selling by Latia Curry, from Harvard Business Review, August 26, 2020.


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