0 0
Read Time:5 Minute, 16 Second
Harvard Business Review: Stop Telling Women They Have Imposter Syndrome

Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.


Harvard Business Review: Stop Telling Women They Have Imposter Syndrome

Read Stop Telling Women They Have Imposter Syndrome by Ruchika Tulshyan and Jodi-Ann Burey, from Harvard Business Review, February 11, 2021.

This might come across as a hot-take, but the idea of ‘imposter syndrome’ may not be the right answer for how women experience life in the workplace. Imposter syndrome “is loosely defined as doubting your abilities and feeling like a fraud. It disproportionately affects high-achieving people, who find it difficult to accept their accomplishments. Many question whether they’re deserving of accolades.”

The authors, Tulshyan and Burey, question “why imposter syndrome exists in the first place and what role workplace systems play in fostering and exacerbating it in women. We think there’s room to question imposter syndrome as the reason women may be inclined to distrust their success.” While they do not dismiss imposter syndrome, they begin to look at other factors that were not explored in the 70s by the original creators of the term.

“The impact of systemic racism, classism, xenophobia, and other biases was categorically absent when the concept of imposter syndrome was developed. Many groups were excluded from the study, namely women of color and people of various income levels, genders, and professional backgrounds. Even as we know it today, imposter syndrome puts the blame on individuals, without accounting for the historical and cultural contexts that are foundational to how it manifests in both women of color and white women. Imposter syndrome directs our view toward fixing women at work instead of fixing the places where women work.

by Ruchika Tulshyan and Jodi-Ann Burey, from Harvard Business Review, February 11, 2021.

In case the takeaway from that sentiment was lost, here it is in a larger font:

Imposter syndrome directs our view toward fixing women at work instead of fixing the places where women work.

In many ways, putting the onus on women to solve the culture that perpetuates these feelings is akin to asking people of color to identify and solve the racism that exists in the workplace.

Imposter syndrome as a concept fails to capture this dynamic and puts the onus on women to deal with the effects. Workplaces remain misdirected toward seeking individual solutions for issues disproportionately caused by systems of discrimination and abuses of power.

by Ruchika Tulshyan and Jodi-Ann Burey, from Harvard Business Review, February 11, 2021.

Fixing Bias, Not Women

I can’t and won’t speak for women’s experiences in the workplace, but I have experienced imposter syndrome before – before I realized that it was actually racism made to look like it was my fault. My forced choice to leave was a blessing in disguise, but its impact on me has lasted for years. The authors believe that workplace leaders must address this environment rather than help women change themselves to fit in.

“Leaders must create a culture for women and people of color that addresses systemic bias and racism. Only by doing so can we reduce the experiences that culminate in so-called imposter syndrome among employees from marginalized communities — or at the very least, help those employees channel healthy self-doubt into positive motivation, which is best fostered within a supportive work culture.

Perhaps then we can stop misdiagnosing women with “imposter syndrome” once and for all.”

Continue reading Stop Telling Women They Have Imposter Syndrome by Ruchika Tulshyan and Jodi-Ann Burey, from Harvard Business Review, February 11, 2021.


Instagram: Antiracist Education Now!

Follow Antiracist Education Now! on Instagram.

Unless we work to dismantle white supremacy, we will continue to teach it to the youngest among us. As a college educator, committed to building an antiracist community, I need reminders and tips on how to do this. The Instagram account Antiracist Education Now! focuses on K-12 education, but its ideas permeate all education environments. Plus some of the images and quotations transcend.

For instance, this James Baldwin quotation reminded me of when I was told in a meeting with my peers, on whether a hiring committee needed POC on it and I said I was on it, my associate VP said to me and the group, “oh Joseph, you know you’re White.”

It didn’t occur to me that no only was my identity stripped of me, it was replaced by the allegedly more desirable White identity. And if they felt comfortable telling me, in my role as a social justice educator, what were they telling our students?

This Instagram account is a great teach tool – highly recommended.

Follow Antiracist Education Now! on Instagram.


Diverse Issues: Community College Leaders Strategize Solutions to Student Success Barriers

Read Community College Leaders Strategize Solutions to Student Success Barriers by Sarah Wood, from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, March 8, 2021.

My 2021 goal is to read through and present more community college-focused news. With the vast majority of students enrolled in higher education through a community college, I commit myself to learning more and sharing more when I can.

To kick off, I found an article by Sarah Woods in Diverse Issues in Higher Education the shared strategies shared by community college leaders at a recent conference,  Innovations Conference hosted by the League for Innovation in the Community College.

From scaffolded food prep training for food insecure students, to cohort development among adult students, to prioritizing international education for community college students, the programs shared offer promising practices that could be adapted at other college campuses. I plan to read more into their campus impact reports to learn more.

What group of students are you committed to learn more about?

Continue reading Community College Leaders Strategize Solutions to Student Success Barriers by Sarah Wood, from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, March 8, 2021.


Join the Mailing List

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.
Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
Joseph Rios, EdD
leadershipandvaluesinaction@gmail.com
I am Joseph Rios and I believe that leadership is an expression of our values
Previous post The Struggle Being an Extrovert in Isolation
Next post Three Ways to Manage Anniversary Reactions

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply