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Counting on Leaders to Take Care of Themselves – HigherEdJobs.com

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Read Counting on Leaders to Take Care of Themselves by Christopher D. Lee, Ph.D from HigherEdJobs.com, October 7, 2019. Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.

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“Managers are supervisors; leaders are mentors, supporters, sponsors, and cheerleaders. The relationship is often reciprocal. Leaders help make others better, and everyone who has a great leader wants them to be well. They know for selfish reasons that the leader’s success is also theirs.

“A quote plastered on a training colleague’s door says it all: “Everyone wins when a leader gets better.” But, what happens when a leader is not well? Leaders should appreciate the fact that if they do not take care of themselves, they actually harm more than just themselves. Doctors’ orders for leaders might be to get rest, mind one’s health, and to accept help.”

by Christopher D. Lee, Ph.D from HigherEdJobs.com October 7, 2019

I am reminded of a September not too long ago, when I was talking to a supervisor about work that needed to be completed by hadn’t been started. We were working without a full staff, so we all took on more work than usual. But at the start of a semester, the extra work felt more…extra. And I cried in his office.

Not because I was upset that I hadn’t completed the work. I cried because I was tired, both physically and emotionally, and I didn’t know where this extra energy was going to come from to complete this work. I hadn’t had a full weekend off in over six weeks and I was tired. And it was now affecting my ability to be on top of it all.

“When leaders are not well, everyone suffers. People can offer their leaders help in large and small ways. Leaders should be gracious enough — and smart enough — to accept help.”

by Christopher D. Lee, Ph.D from HigherEdJobs.com October 7, 2019

I had worked in several offices, previously, where we never asked for more of anything – time, help, support. And I brought this internal rule to this new job. And it wasn’t a rule at all. My supervisor was gracious enough to listen to me, look at the projects that needed to be completed and create new timelines for completion. And I was not allowed to work the following weekend, even though it was a usual ‘all hands on deck’ situation.

I began to understand that when I was tired and working from less than 100%, I wasn’t particularly effective with the work I was doing. Nor was I particularly nice to people. I needed my leader to see this in me and I needed to be gracious enough to accept the solution.

From that point on, I was very aware of my limits and health. If you are working in an office that doesn’t value your health, leave. Your body, mind and spirit will thank you later. Trust me on that.

Read Counting on Leaders to Take Care of Themselves by Christopher D. Lee, Ph.D from HigherEdJobs.com, October 7, 2019. Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.


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