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TheHill.com: Due to COVID-19, thousands of low-income students are deferring and dropping college plans

Read Due to COVID-19, thousands of low-income students are deferring and dropping college plans by Richard Whitmire, from TheHill.com, May 17, 2020

Read We’re About to Have the Longest Summer Vacation Ever. That’s Going to Be a Problem by Evan Mandery, from Politico, May 17, 2020

Read It’s time to reflect on what college should be by James Merisotis, from the Lumina Foundation, May 18, 2020

Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday

Wifi Wednesday

TheHill.com: Due to COVID-19, thousands of low-income students are deferring and dropping college plans

Read Due to COVID-19, thousands of low-income students are deferring and dropping college plans by Richard Whitmire, from TheHill.com, May 17, 2020

The stresses of trying to find work, provide food for the family, take care of siblings who would otherwise stay with extended family or daycare – all of these reasons and more will keep graduating seniors from looking into higher education. For many of these families, with a senior who would be a first-generation college student, its imperative that all people who can earn a wage makes that a priority. Even if its at the risk of pursuing a college degree.

The most promising solution we’ve seen yet for leveling the nation’s ballooning income and wealth gaps — first-generation students earning bachelor’s degrees — appears to be unraveling.

Because of COVID-19, thousands of low-income students are deferring and dropping college plans, indicate multiple student surveys. Or, they are scaling back from a four-year college to a community college, where the odds of ever earning a four-year degree plummet.

Middle-class college-goers may consider a “gap year,” where they defer college for a year, usually finding something educationally enriching to do for a year. But that’s not what’s happening with low-income students. 

By Richard Whitmire, TheHill.com, May 17, 2020

We need to continue to care about these students, with so much potential to achieve a college degree. What strategies need to be implemented to track their time out of school before they enroll? How do we develop resources for them to use once they’re able to return to a degree? And for institutions, that care about the diversity of their classes, to what degree will this stop-out create for their intentionally diverse classes? So many questions for me, at this point.

A college degree, said Hurd, is the most effective tool for reducing inter-generational poverty. “But if the students don’t go to college, the economic mobility won’t happen.” “I’m concerned the class of 2020 could be the least diverse group of students we’ve seen in higher ed in decades. We are going to lose all gains we’ve made.”  

By Richard Whitmire, TheHill.com, May 17, 2020

Continue reading Due to COVID-19, thousands of low-income students are deferring and dropping college plans by Richard Whitmire, from TheHill.com, May 17, 2020

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