HigherEdJobs.com: Examining the Pipeline for Leadership Positions in Higher Education (and other WIFI articles)

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Inside HigherEd: Learning During the Pandemic

Read Learning During the Pandemic, by Doug Lederman, Inside HigherEd, April 15, 2020.

So many valuable lessons are emerging as students continue to learn from home. I don’t want to call it distance learning, since there are pedagogical differences between that style of teaching and the quick ways entire programs moved digitally. There have been much written about the disruption of in-person delivery for the most at-risk students (Example One, Two, Three).

One area that will continue to hold my attention is the impact of digital formats for those from rural America or those without digital infrastructures in their neighborhoods, like low-income or poor families.

Doug Lederman, in Inside HigherEd, shares how colleges are trying to mitigate the impact. The parking lot idea is kind of genius – will others follow suit?

This doesn’t fall into that life-or-death category, but among the most distressing education-related articles I’ve read in recent days are several (including herehere and here) about how certain groups of students — especially financially needy students and those who live in rural communities — are struggling to continue learning as colleges have shifted to remote instruction.

Many colleges are doing what they can to try to minimize the extent to which lack of digital access worsens existing gaps in college access and attainment for some groups. Many are lending or giving out laptops or personal hotspots to students in need, others are turning their parking lots into broadband access points and some, like the Portland Community College Foundation, have contracted with internet service providers to make their wireless services available to students at no charge.

By Doug Lederman, Inside HigherEd, April 15, 2020.

I believe that when faculty, staff and students return to their on-campus ways of working, one area of concern will be how they will continue their outreach and support for this vulnerable population. Will those hotspots still be available after classes resume in person? Will a laptop be given so freely? I think we should all be asking these questions now rather than hope they will be addressed later.

In a recent conversation about how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the landscape for higher education, Vincent del Casino Jr., provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at San José State University, said that as colleges and universities think about where they are vulnerable to educational “interruptions” going forward, they might spend their precious partnership dollars not with online program management companies (whose work del Casino generally shuns) but with “Comcast, Verizon and other ISPs.”

By Doug Lederman, Inside HigherEd, April 15, 2020.

Continue Learning During the Pandemic, by Doug Lederman, Inside HigherEd, April 15, 2020.

About Post Author

Joseph Rios, EdD

I am Joseph Rios and I believe that leadership is an expression of our values
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