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New York Times: Returning to the Office Sparks Anxiety and Dread for Some

New York Times: Returning to the Office Sparks Anxiety and Dread for Some

Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.


New York Times: Returning to the Office Sparks Anxiety and Dread for Some

Read Returning to the Office Sparks Anxiety and Dread for Some by Julie Creswell and Peter Eavis, from the New York Times, April 2, 2021.

As an extrovert working in isolation for the past year, I have been ready to work away from home for some time!

But I know this isn’t the case for everyone. My husband, for one, loves the flexibility to work from home. His work is largely remote, since he works in the East Coast office of a West Coast company. I know he and his colleagues are looking at ways to continue working from home after restrictions are lifted and people can work in the office again.

But what about other workers?

Authors Creswell and Eavis in the New York Times shared that “many companies are falling over themselves to appeal to office-reluctant workers. Salesforce says its work-from-anywhere approach would “unlock new growth opportunities” and “drive greater equality.” Spotify describes its flexible work policy as a “jewel in our Talent Attraction crown.”

“Target, Ford Motor Co., and PricewaterhouseCoopers say they are going to let office workers work remotely more frequently. Even Wall Street banks where employees often while away hours at their desks to be seen by the boss are preaching the gospel of flexibility. JPMorgan Chase is telling some workers they can cycle in and out of the office.”

Given the choice to return to the office full-time, part-time, or somewhere in between, what preference do you have? And what concessions, if any, would you ask your employer to make for you now and in the future regarding working from home?

Continue reading Returning to the Office Sparks Anxiety and Dread for Some by Julie Creswell and Peter Eavis, from the New York Times, April 2, 2021.


Harvard Business Review: Companies Should Do More to Normalize Career Breaks

Read Companies Should Do More to Normalize Career Breaks by Carol Fishman Cohen, from Harvard Business Review, April 6, 2021.

Last week, I wrote about red flags that can show up in a resume. Employment gaps, without explanation, can be interpreted by potential employers differently than intended. But what about career breaks for family reasons, covered by law or out of family necessity? Author Carol Fishman Cohen from the Harvard Business Review makes the case that these types of breaks need to be shown some respect!

In late March, LinkedIn announced that its dropdown menus for creating a profile will now include “Stay at Home Parent” and other designations to indicate that someone spent time away from the traditional workforce. The move came after recent criticism that some of the networking platform’s format requirements — such as the convention that every job title be followed by an employer — were insensitive to people who took breaks from paid employment. Following a pandemic-induced exodus from the workforce of more than two million women, this issue has never been more relevant.

LinkedIn’s move is an enormous step toward normalizing employment breaks as a common part of a career path. The significance of this development for the millions of people who have struggled to explain a resume gap cannot be overstated. By doing this, LinkedIn, which has become the world’s arbiter and marketplace of resumes and work histories, is recognizing and even validating the decision to take a career break and then relaunch back into the professional world.

In many ways, this is a milestone event worth celebrating — but more needs to happen.

by Carol Fishman Cohen, from Harvard Business Review, April 6, 2021.

For your own company or organization, how can you address this type of career break using your own applicant tracking system?

What type of opportunities does your company or organization offer to candidates returning to work after a career break? How often are these candidates hired into full-time positions? And how are these opportunities shared among the people who most need the opportunities for full-time work?

Lots of questions to consider – how are you helping find the answers?

Continue reading Companies Should Do More to Normalize Career Breaks by Carol Fishman Cohen, from Harvard Business Review, April 6, 2021.


Diverse Issues: Stakeholders Call for Focus on Equity as Community Colleges Recover From COVID-19 Crisis

Read Stakeholders Call for Focus on Equity as Community Colleges Recover From COVID-19 Crisis by Sarah Wood, from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, April 5, 2021.

During the pandemic, “community colleges overall faced enrollment declines. Freshman enrollment dropped by 19%, while overall community college enrollment decreased by 9.5%, according to data from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.” While many CCs were able to offer financial incentives or emergency loans for students to return, not all CCs had the same resources. The lack of equity to support CC students across the country will resonate for some time after COVID 19 ends.

Now, with the spring semester in full swing, community colleges continue to look for innovative ways to adapt to the ongoing disruptions within the education sector.

Going forward, Trent recommends that community colleges invest in flexible programs, scheduling, professional development and technology with a focus on equity.

“We need to start looking at the lessons learned, in terms of who has been successful in this environment and who has not been successful,” says Trent. “What groups were disenfranchised and why? We always want to make sure that we are creating equitable opportunities for our students.”

by Sarah Wood, from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, April 5, 2021.

Continue reading Stakeholders Call for Focus on Equity as Community Colleges Recover From COVID-19 Crisis by Sarah Wood, from Diverse Issues in Higher Education, April 5, 2021.


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