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HigherEdJobs.com: Should I Stay or Should I Go? Do Something!

Read Should I Stay or Should I Go? Do Something!, posted by Daniel B. Griffith on HigherEdJobs.com. Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.

I am writing my next book about lessons I’ve learned about developing myself as a professional. In my search for good and interesting ideas on taking ownership of ones professional life, this article in HigherEdJobs.com stuck out to me.

Especially in light of a years-long job search, it reminds me that I have more agency that I have admitted to myself. I found it interesting in its direct approach and its calling out behaviors I have done myself. Please share with anyone who might be it equally interesting.

Take a lesson from Admiral Stockdale. “We must stay focused on our goals to realize a better work, career, and job situation and take deliberate action until these goals are achieved.

“Letting go of the weak hope that your situation will improve soon can liberate you to concentrate on the essential attitudes, decisions, and actions for surviving until you realize a better situation, which you will achieve through your efforts rather than hope alone.”

By Daniel B. Griffith, HigherEdJobs.com, February 5, 2020

Realize you have choices, then act upon them.  “Being proactive in a bad job situation helps us make choices that either move us toward an improved situation, because we have more control of such matters, or equip us to respond appropriately when we are frustrated about matters we can’t control.

“We can take steps to develop ourselves, enhance our resume, and identify career opportunities that are more rewarding. We can take stock of our current situation, identify possible opportunities for learning and growth, and in the worst moments maintain professionalism, refusing to be pulled in by negativity and the reactive behaviors of others.”

By Daniel B. Griffith, HigherEdJobs.com, February 5, 2020

Have the difficult conversations you need to have to improve your situation. “A common cause for our difficult job situations is difficulty communicating with someone else. This is often the boss, but may be a peer, or even a direct report. Perhaps, then, our indecision about “should I stay or go,” boils down to, “should I talk with or avoid the person who is making my life difficult?”

“Regrettably, the answer is often avoidance and then enduring the negative circumstances that could have improved with the right conversation. Whether to confront negative behavior or negotiate for improved work conditions or opportunities, finding ways to address concerns with that individual is crucial for ending this loop.”

By Daniel B. Griffith, HigherEdJobs.com, February 5, 2020

Read Should I Stay or Should I Go? Do Something!, posted by Daniel B. Griffith on HigherEdJobs.com. Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.

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