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Inside Higher Ed: 6 Factors Impacting Campus Counseling Centers

Part of WiFi (What I Find Interesting) Wednesday.


Inside Higher Ed: 6 Factors Impacting Campus Counseling Centers

Read 6 Factors Impacting Campus Counseling Centers by Melissa Ezarik, from Inside Higher Ed, April 21, 2021.

Recently, Inside Higher Ed and College Pulse completed a survey that captured the perceptions of 2,002 college students (mainly traditional aged, and all but 250 from four-year institutions) one year into life with COVID-19.

Interesting takeaways from the survey:

  • 65 percent of students report having fair or poor mental health.
  • 63 percent of those who say it’s poor would grade their college’s response to student mental health and wellness services a C or lower (compared to 43 percent of all students).
  • 47 percent say they could have used some (28 percent) or a lot (19 percent) more support from their college during this time.
  • Only 15 percent engaged in college-offered counseling in the past year.

Continue reading 6 Factors Impacting Campus Counseling Centers by Melissa Ezarik, from Inside Higher Ed, April 21, 2021.


Student Affairs NOW Podcast: Sustainability

Listen to Sustainability on Student Affairs NOW! Podcast, April 21, 2021.

Dr. Keith Edwards discusses sustainability in student affairs and higher education with three leading experts and practitioners. They discuss what sustainability means and how it can be integrated into campus operations and student learning.

Panelists include

  • Dr. Paul Morgan, Professor in the Department of Educational Foundations and Policy Studies at West Chester University of Pennsylvania.
  • Grace Kazmierski, Assistant Director for Student Engagement in the Office of Sustainability at the University of South Carolina. 
  • Vigor Lam, a construction, design, and student affairs professional who works at Kitchell CEM as a consultant with City College of San Francisco in Facilities, Construction, and Planning. 

My favorite takeaway from the conversation was the introduction given by Dr. Morgan:

One of my favorite definitions comes from Julian Agyeman, who was a professor at Tufts, and he focuses on what he calls just sustainability, just as injustice, right? And his term is, you know he likes this language, you know, the need to ensure a better quality of life for all now and into the future in a just and equitable manner while living within the earth supporting ecosystems. So this makes sure that we’re not talking about this as something like, you know, you have to be concerned for your grandchildren because there are people right now who are suffering the effects of climate change of environmental injustice. And so, that’s going on right now. And if we’re including everybody in the conversation, then our definition is going to be much more holistic. And it’s going to really focus on the marginalized and not just folks in the first world.

When we start the conversation from this point of view, we really can start making a change in our immediate communities. In what ways have you included sustainability in the work you do?

Continue Sustainability on Student Affairs NOW! Podcast, April 21, 2021.


Inside Higher Ed: When Colleges Close

Read When Colleges Close by Scott Jaschik, from Inside Higher Ed, April 21, 2021.

Three years ago, the college where I worked closed after being given six weeks’ notice. It was a surprise announcement, but after hearing more about the administration issues, it came as less of a surprise. Many other colleges have announced their closures, including Mills College in California.

Last year, I published a book, Tales of a Displaced Worker, which recounted my experiences as a staff member dealing with the emotional and professional aftermath. Given my role in the institution, I couldn’t speak to the administrative decision-making or to the motivation to make such an announcement. The leaders of the college that I worked at have not published anything since the closure.

But recently, the former president and vice president of Wheellock College in Boston, which also closed in 2018, recently published When Colleges Close: Leading in a Time of Crisis. They spoke with Inside Higher Ed about their experiences and what other college leaders can learn from their closure:

On Closure versus Seeking A Partner

While we were not on the verge of closure, many data points including regional demographics, first-year discount rates, graduate debt load and deferred maintenance were part of an increasing trend pointing to budgetary challenges and concerns about our ability to offer a high-quality experience for our students. Our Board of Trustees was examining this well before the decision was made to seek an outside partner.

On Lessons Learned from the Closure

Crises in any sector require leadership to be overly communicative about anticipated change. It requires honesty when you don’t know which direction will be taken and transparency once you do know. This has been tremendously useful in helping people transition.

Continue When Colleges Close by Scott Jaschik, from Inside Higher Ed, April 21, 2021.


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Joseph Rios, EdD
leadershipandvaluesinaction@gmail.com
I am Joseph Rios and I believe that leadership is an expression of our values
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