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Harvard Business Review: To Take Care of Others, Start by Taking Care of Yourself (and other WiFi articles)

Read To Take Care of Others, Start by Taking Care of Yourself by Whitney Johnson and Amy Humble, from Harvard Business Review, April 28, 2020

Read 15 Fall Scenarios by Edward J. Maloney and Joshua Kim, from InsideHigherEd.com, April 22, 2020 (Page 2)

Read Why You Should Analyze Job Descriptions as Career Exploration by Justin Zackal, from HigherEdJobs.com, April 26, 2020 (Page 3)

Part of What I Find Interesting (WIFI) Wednesdays

Harvard Business Review: To Take Care of Others, Start by Taking Care of Yourself

Read To Take Care of Others, Start by Taking Care of Yourself by Whitney Johnson and Amy Humble, from Harvard Business Review, April 28, 2020

When traveling by air, you hear during the safety instructions ‘affix your own mask before helping those around you.’ It’s great advice for two reasons: 1) we can’t help others with the best versions of ourselves if we’re struggling too and 2) prioritizing yourself is not a selfish act. As a person who is drawn to helping roles, I have struggled with putting myself care as a priority. Lately, it has led to delays in productivity, but the trade-off is that my self-preservation is now the priority. I will always have more time for work.

The authors offers four suggestions:

1) Start with self-care. We can’t share with others a resource that we lack ourselves.

2) Ask for help when you need it. If you don’t ask for that support, the need for it will be revealed in ways that don’t serve you.

3) Ask others “How are you?” Take time to listen to their full answer and walk through your personal rollercoaster ride.

4) Look for the positive and say it aloud. Express appreciation, give compliments, and call out triumphs, no matter how small. If you see something good, speak up.

by Whitney Johnson and Amy Humble, from Harvard Business Review, April 28, 2020

One thing I learned earlier today is to avoid asking people ‘how are you doing?’ because it may force people to mask their feelings of anxiety and fear to make it seem like they have it all together. Instead, think about asking ‘what’s something interesting you watched/read/did in the last couple of days?’ Focus on tasks and interests, and it could open up a conversation that gets to the fears and anxieties being felt.

Continue reading To Take Care of Others, Start by Taking Care of Yourself by Whitney Johnson and Amy Humble, from Harvard Business Review, April 28, 2020

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